Small is the new Big when it comes to house size...jroosevelt@kw.com, Janice Roosevelt, Keller Williams, PA & DE

By
Real Estate Agent with Rory Burkhart Team, Keller Williams

This past year was the first time since 1984 that the average size of a new home decreased

 in square footage. 

New homes are now 7% smaller, or the size of one average sized room. Specifically, the median square footage  fell to 2,065 square feet in the first three months of this year, compared with the same period last year, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Just like McDonalds had to revamp their menus offering healthier options, so too is our penchant for "McMansions."  It sure does cost less to heat, cool, and run a smaller house - not to mention taxes are lower.

Susanka, author of the book, The Not So Big House, says "A new ethic is arising right now that will become commonplace. As more and more people build or remodel homes that satisfy in quality rather than quantity, there will be a huge shift in what we perceive as desirable."

Susanka posits the current downsizing  trend mimics one of 100 years ago, when small  bungalows replaced large and ornate  Victorian homes as  Americans's design of choice.

CNN MONEY plauses it  could also  be the recession citing  Kermit Baker, the chief economist for the American Institute of Architects. "Home size gains flatten out or decline during recessions, and we're in the midst of the most serious housing recession in decades."

Personally, the shift in attitude towards conservation of resources and lightening our carbon footprint is refreshing.  Leonardo da Vinci quipped, "Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.

 Your thoughts?

And, if you're looking for the perfect smaller homein the Kennett Square area, contact me for information about TMG builders and Pennock Greene

jroosevelt@kw.com

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Comments 6 New Comment

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Rainmaker
738,498
Gabrielle Kamahele Rhind
Broker/Owner
KGC Properties LLC, Tucson Property Management & Real Estate

GOOD MORNING JANICE!  Good information - I too have read that the trend is downsizing.  I believe with the Buyers I am coming across - the square footage isn't number one on the list anymore! -- Gabrielle

September 09, 2009 06:29 AM
Rainer
61,764
Moshe Cohen
PhD
Valuation Solutions

Janice

Part of the impact is due to the significant decrease in new construction. New ly constructed homes tend to be larger than the older inventory of homes taken out of the market.

September 09, 2009 06:42 AM
Rainmaker
468,836
Janice Roosevelt
OICP ABR, ePRO,Ecobroker
Rory Burkhart Team, Keller Williams

Moshe, this is true, like the old gas-guzzling SUVs - there are some great prices out there for families who do want the larger, newer home

September 09, 2009 06:46 AM
Rainmaker
468,836
Janice Roosevelt
OICP ABR, ePRO,Ecobroker
Rory Burkhart Team, Keller Williams

Gabrielle, I've felt all along that it is not about square footage, although some buyer seem obssessed by it. It's about how you USE the space.

September 09, 2009 06:47 AM
Anonymous #5
Anonymous
Anonymous

I was so happy to read that article about new home size declining. Every time I inspect a McMansion, I ask myself, "Why?".

September 09, 2009 11:50 AM
Rainmaker
468,836
Janice Roosevelt
OICP ABR, ePRO,Ecobroker
Rory Burkhart Team, Keller Williams

When I built a 3-bedroom saltbox style house on a high hill - nearly 30 years ago, I looked out at meadows and a herd of Holstein cattle (with one brown Swiss)

As the landscape changed, filling with those large homes, we'd laugh as each new family moved in. Initially, all the lights would be on inside and out - it was like a landing strip. One month later, as in they got their first electricity bill, the lights were dimmed. Unfortunately those are the houses sitting on the market a lot longer now.

September 09, 2009 12:03 PM
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Rainmaker
468,836

Janice Roosevelt

OICP ABR, ePRO,Ecobroker
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