BIG SOUTH FORK TENNESSEE: The Beautiful Bradford Pear Tree

By
Real Estate Agent with Tennessee Recreational Properties

The Bradford Pear is often planted in a "allee" because of its uniform shapeWhile most pear trees are grown for their fruit, the Bradford Pear is grown for its shape. Although it is hardy in Zones 4-9, that is, it should thrive in most areas of the country, I had never seen it until I came to Tennessee.

It has a very distinctive shape, pyramidal when the tree is immature and oval when mature. It is remarkably uniform; the reason is that it was cloned from a single tree. It is noted for its rapid growth, often at the rate of two feet per year, until it reaches its full height of 30-50 feet. Its spread is 25-35 feet and it lends itself to planting in rows. I have seen it widely used here to create an "allee" leading to a property or as a windbreak/privacy screen across the front of a property. It is, unfortunately, a short-lived tree, lasting only 15-30 years, and because it is brittle, it often sustains damage from wind.

It is also remarkable for its profusion of white flowers in early spring, often before the leaves even develop. In contrast to their pleasing appearance, however, the flowers have an unpleasant odor which has been described as "like rotten fish." While it is commonly planted for its decorative value, having become a ubiquity in many suburban communities, its hard little fruits are enjoyed by birds. Here in the Southeastern United States, the Bradford Pear tends to be among the more reliable coloring trees.

The Bradfor Pear is one of the most colorful trees in Tennessee

Also, in Tennessee, the Bradford Pear is the very last tree to color and can remain green until mid-November. In autumn, the leaves begin to turn bright red, developing a lovely pattern and then turning to dark red before falling. The Bradford Pear is a pleasure to behold, year round, and is one of the many things I have come to appreciate here in Tennessee.

For information about Big South Fork real estate or horse properties in Jamestown, Tennessee, go to www.trailridersrealestate.com

close

This entry hasn't been re-blogged:

Re-Blogged By Re-Blogged At
Topic:
Real Estate General Information
Location:
Tennessee Fentress County Jamestown Big South Fork
Groups:
ActiveRain Nature Station
Curb Appeal
Posts to Localism
Tennessee
The Optimist
Tags:
bradford pear tree
colorful foliage
jamestown tennessee
big south fork
big south fork tennessee

Anonymous
Post a Comment
Spam prevention

Accessibility option: listen to a question and answer it!

To submit the form,
drag the folder to the circle on the side.

Type below the answer to what you hear. Numbers or words, lowercase:

Spam prevention

Accessibility option: listen to a question and answer it!

To submit the form,
drag the clock to the circle on the side.

Type below the answer to what you hear. Numbers or words, lowercase:

Show All Comments
Rainmaker
453,501
John Mulkey
TheHousingGuru.com - Waleska, GA
Housing Guru

Leslie - Bradford Pears do generate some nice color, but you pointed out their shortcomings. I prefer the "native" look.

December 01, 2009 07:29 AM #1
Rainer
286,994
Leslie Helm
Tennessee Recreational Properties - Jamestown, TN
Real Estate For Trail Riders

Hi, John. I was quite taken with the "pattern" that develops as the leaves turn from green to red. These trees are EVERYWHERE here so I can admire them without actually having any. LOL.

December 01, 2009 10:36 AM #2
Rainmaker
841,584
Fred Carver-Top Realtor Victoria, BC
Re/Max Camosun Victoria BC Real Estate - Victoria, BC
Accredited Victoria BC Real Estate Consultant

Hi Leslie...Very Interesting, I'm sure I've seen this tree, but never gave it any thought to what it was. Thanks for this informative post and great photos :O))

December 01, 2009 10:42 AM #3
Rainer
286,994
Leslie Helm
Tennessee Recreational Properties - Jamestown, TN
Real Estate For Trail Riders

Hi, Fred. Thanks for the compliments. I've been doing alot of Localism posts and it's amazing what catches your eye even when you haven't gone anywhere or done anything special. The middle leaf was on a tree in front of the Jamestown library...I snatched it off the tree and photographed it on the hood of my car! The "allee" photo was a little more exciting...I stopped to get that picture JUST as the homeowner was returning home and turning into his driveway.

December 01, 2009 06:04 PM #4
Rainmaker
1,011,004
Sharon Tara
Sharon Tara Transformations - Portsmouth, NH
New Hampshire Home Stager

Very interesting!  It doesn't actually have pears, and it smells like rotten fish?  It's a darn good thing that it is at least visually appealing!  Awesome photos and funny story about getting them!

December 01, 2009 09:03 PM #5
Anonymous
Anonymous
Anonymous

Nice nature blog post, Leslie.

Callery pears (Pyrus calleryana) are native to China, but the Bradford cultivar (Pyrus calleryana 'Bradford') is grown throughout North America in urban settings because of its shape. Because of its short life span and brittle branches, it has been losing favor in areas with snowfall and high winds, which doesn't really leave that much. A better cultivar is the Cleveland Select pear (Pyrus calleryana 'Cleveland Select').

Happy December!

December 02, 2009 01:11 AM #6
Rainer
286,994
Leslie Helm
Tennessee Recreational Properties - Jamestown, TN
Real Estate For Trail Riders

Hi, Sharon. Well, when you put it that way....

Coming from New England, I still love pine trees best.

December 02, 2009 12:24 PM #7
Rainer
286,994
Leslie Helm
Tennessee Recreational Properties - Jamestown, TN
Real Estate For Trail Riders

Hey, Russel, is there ANYTHING you don't know something about??

December 02, 2009 12:25 PM #8
Rainmaker
238,853
Gene Allen
Resh Realty Group - Virginia Beach, VA
Realtor Hampton Roads Real Estate

They are pretty but like you said they are very brittle.

December 02, 2009 09:29 PM #9
Rainer
286,994
Leslie Helm
Tennessee Recreational Properties - Jamestown, TN
Real Estate For Trail Riders

Hi, Gene. I guess nothing's perfect. I sure enjoyed seeing the leaves develop that interesting pattern as they changed color, though. I don't know of any other tree that does that, or at least I've never seen one.

December 03, 2009 06:06 AM #10
Rainmaker
428,614
Anne Hensel
South Beaches Real Estate Professionals - Saint Petersburg, FL
Realtor - Broker - St. Pete Beach, Treasure Island

The pictures are great. I miss trees and the color change. I my area we have mostly palm trees and they look the same all year long.

December 03, 2009 07:00 AM #11
Rainer
286,994
Leslie Helm
Tennessee Recreational Properties - Jamestown, TN
Real Estate For Trail Riders

Hi, Anne. I lived in the Florida panhandle for 3 years and was so disappointed because palm trees were not indigenous that far north and it was too far south for the deciduous trees I was so use to seeing in New England. Part of the reason I only lasted a short time in Florida is that I missed the seasons. Now I'm what's called a "Halfback."

December 03, 2009 07:17 AM #12
Anonymous
Anonymous
Kay

These trees grow in Glendale and Burbank in southern California.  i love them for their colors.  Just spectacular.  

January 03, 2010 09:34 PM #13
Rainer
286,994
Leslie Helm
Tennessee Recreational Properties - Jamestown, TN
Real Estate For Trail Riders

Hi, Kay. Thanks for commenting. i guess these trees grow all over the country but i had never seen them before. I was really taken with the uniform shape and with the incredible pattern the leaves develop as they turn from green to red.

January 04, 2010 07:02 AM #14
Anonymous
Post a Comment
Spam prevention

Accessibility option: listen to a question and answer it!

To submit the form,
drag the sunglasses to the circle on the side.

Type below the answer to what you hear. Numbers or words, lowercase:

Show All Comments
Rainer
286,994

Leslie Helm

Real Estate For Trail Riders
Ask me a question
*
*
*
Spam prevention

Accessibility option: listen to a question and answer it!

To submit the form,
drag the flag to the circle on the side.

Type below the answer to what you hear. Numbers or words, lowercase:

Additional Information