Have Wolves Returned to New Hampshire?

By
Real Estate Broker/Owner with Jan Stearns, Waterville Valley Realty, Waterville Valley, NH

Wolves in New Hampshire?

A couple of weeks ago as I was driving home from work at night an animal ran out of the forest and across the road in front of my car.  I saw it clear as day.  It was a wolf...or, at least it looked like the wolves I've seen on TV and in movies.  I told my husband about it, but he said I probably saw a coy dog, not a wolf.  Well, I've seen coy dogs before and this was definitely NOT an eastern coyote.  And its appearance was wild and not domesticated.

Being an obsessive Googler, I searched online for photos of wolves (yup, the animal I Gray wolf - photo from Google Imagessaw looked just like the gray wolves I found in the Google images - example at right), but the news articles I found online indicated that there have been no confirmed sightings or killings of wild wolves in New Hampshire in many, many years.

I didn't tell anyone else but my husband about my wolf sighting because I didn't want people to start thinking of me as the next Big Foot-type lunatic!

This morning my officemate, Debbie Duffy, arrived at work and excitedly told me that she'd just seen a wolf run across Rt. 49 (the state highway that connects Waterville Valley to the rest of the world).  She, too, Googled wolf photos online and confirmed that, indeed, the animal she saw was a gray wolf.

I was so excited to hear about her sighting and described the animal I had seen to her.  "Yes," she exclaimed, "that sounds just like what I saw." 

Hmmmm...is it possible that wolves have returned to New Hampshire? 

There is a deep cultural fear of wolves.  Think "Little Red Riding Hood." 

According to information I found online, the gray wolf has been persecuted by man for centuries.  In New England the gray wolf was hunted to extinction by the mid 1800s. 

In October of 2007, a wolf was shot in a rural area of northern Massachusetts. The animal had been reported to state biologists after a rash of sheep killings on a farm in the area. The day after biologists investigated, the animal was shot by someone other than the farmer. The biologists would not name the guilty party but stomach contents of the animal confirmed that it was predating on sheep.

It was originally assumed that the animal was an escaped wolf but this has proven not to be the case. Biologists and conservationists have long thought that the recovering eastern Canadian population of gray wolves was likely to move south into the areas of northern New England and upstate New York where appropriate habitat exists. It appears that they were right.

According to my research, young male wolves often separate from the pack over the summer and fall to hunt independently.  I wonder if that's why Debbie and I saw a lone wolf. 

Eric Orff, a Certified Wildlife Biologist, said that New Hampshire, with land that is 90 percent wooded (and Waterville Valley is completely surrounded by the 770,000-acre White Mountain National Forest) and thriving populations of moose, deer and beaver -- prime wolf foods -- has many of the right habitat ingredients to support a wolf population. Within the next few decades, we may see wolves return to New Hampshire on their own.

Cheers!  Jan

 Jan Stearns, Waterville Valley Realty

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Rainer
73,433
Jan Stearns
Jan Stearns, Waterville Valley Realty, Waterville Valley, NH - Waterville Valley, NH
Marketing Dir. 1-888-987-8333

Thanks for stopping by, Secret sorry!  There seem to be a lot of wolf fans in New Hampshire!

Cheers,

Jan

December 13, 2011 01:58 PM #47
Anonymous
Anonymous
Cynthia

Hi Jan,   I have read all the post.. My family travels to NH all the time.. We live in MA.  It is very exciting to read these yet.. there are so many coydogs and wolf hybrids that do resemble the grey wolf.    We have coyotes here in MA that are huge when people thought they were a wolf.   There is a lot of proof that the state needs to "confirm" a sighting.    As I am sure know what they are..  Photoghraps are one.. foot prints is another..  Fir  if you can find it.. and poop.. LOL  if your lucky..  and sadly.. DNA   only way to get that is if it is dead....     Good luck   maybe on my venture up north this summer we may see one.. ..  i will have my camera ready!!!

January 11, 2012 11:02 AM #48
Rainer
73,433
Jan Stearns
Jan Stearns, Waterville Valley Realty, Waterville Valley, NH - Waterville Valley, NH
Marketing Dir. 1-888-987-8333

Hi Cynthia!  I always have my camera at the ready, but it seems I only see interesting wildlife when my headlights illuminate them, or they're dashing past me so fast I can't get my camera out in time!  Thanks for stopping by and reading my post and all the interesting comments. 

FYI, I recently saw a bobcat near Waterville Valley.  That was a first.

Cheers,

Jan

January 12, 2012 10:01 AM #49
Anonymous
Anonymous
John

Hi Jan,

 

It's always interesting to me how readily everyone assumes it's always a Coywolf everytime someone reports seeing pone of these.  As you know, to anyone who's pent any amount of time outdoors, the difference between a Coyote, Coywolf, and Grey Wolf are pretty easy to see.

 

I too have seen wolves on several occasions - once in Rockingham county, and a few times in Errol while fishing.

 

To the doubters: If it's 90-100+ pounds (up to 150 even in rare case), dark, grizzled, broad head, more "massive" and substantial than a Coywolf... IT'S A WOLF.  Why should anyone be surprized? Coywolves havebeen around for decades, have been DNA tested, and shown to be anywhere from 20-85% grey wolf depending on sample.

 

Keep on lookin'!

 

-John

 

January 17, 2012 10:14 AM #50
Rainer
73,433
Jan Stearns
Jan Stearns, Waterville Valley Realty, Waterville Valley, NH - Waterville Valley, NH
Marketing Dir. 1-888-987-8333

Thanks for your input, John.  You're right...there's no comparing the wolf I saw to the coyotes I've seen.  

I'm going to keep on lookin'!

Jan

January 17, 2012 06:40 PM #51
Anonymous
Anonymous
Terry Daly

Hi Jan, I have a story too....this morning Jan. 26, 2012 I was on Rt. 93 heading south about a mile before exit 23. About the Ashland/New Hampton line, it was 9:45 am and from the right side of the highway this wolf just bolted out in front of me! I slammed on my brakes so hard the car skid to the right, I missed him by about 4 inches as he continued east to the median and I'm guessing across the north bound lane. There is no doubt in my mind it was a wolf, he was large, gray/blonde, no tags of course. I was truely shaken up about it and called my husband who said it was either a Shepard or a coyote. I don't care what people say it was as I am positive it was a wolf, no question in my mind. I'm glad I found your site as I feel not as crazy as I did this morning.....thanks for listening!!

Terry Daly

Hebron NH

January 26, 2012 03:10 PM #52
Anonymous
Anonymous
michele from Derry

Jan,

I have seen wild wolves 3 times in New England. I should tell you too that I'm not some flake, because I'm the kind of person that would dismiss something in a heart beat and call the person a flake. I was pre-vet in college and have a very good idea of what a wolf looks like as opposed to other wild canines. I was just hunting around on line actually listening to packs of coyotes because we have one ( a pack) that woke me up last night (while my cat was out) There were several members in this pack and I am trying to get a line on how many there might be. Hubby and I guessed 4 or 5 from the racket they raised last night.

On to the wolves...my first sighting in the late 80's was a real shocking one when I look back on it. It was in the Brookfield area of Mass. That was the shocking part for me that it was so far south! It was a snowy day and I was driving down from NH to visit my boyfriend (later husband), when a canine jumped in front of my car from the side of the road. I'm pretty good at spotting wildlife generally but I hadn't noticed him at all. Suddenly there was a very tall animal in front of me. I slid to a stop. He stood there for several minutes and looked right through the windshield and we locked eyes. He looked like any picture of a wolf except his legs were very long. He looked a bit ungainly, though in good shape. I would describe him (or her) as perhaps a yearling and still not perfectly coordinated. I had no other car or witness during this sighting. I would estimate that he was about 65 lbs. but I think he looked a bit bigger than that due to those long legs and he appeared out of proportion. He DID NOT look like a husky. Then finally after I had taken in the sight of him he decided to continue on into the woods. I uttered something along the lines of ..."Am I seeing what I think I'm seeing?" and then of course he was gone as if he never existed.

The other two sightings there were witnesses. The next one happened early 2000's and then the next one after that was a couple years later. My family camps and hikes the White Mountains of NH. We were having a nice drive on the Kancamagus. The day before we had climbed one of the mountains and we were all sore...lol...so we were taking it easy. We drove by the parking area place where you can view the vista (you know what I'm talking about) Sadly I don't remember what its called but I do know that it was the one that is closest to hike Mt. Hancock, near that hairpin turn. We were all there hubby, son, and our two big American foxhounds who loved to hike with us. I think it was before they revamped that turn off. The area was cordonned off. Police cars were there with their lights going and there were also a couple of the green forest ranger pick-ups. I will never forget it. A forest ranger was there staring down at this huge  "dog" that was laying flat out on his side, not moving. I wasn't very close, but close enough to see that the "dog"' appeared dead. The ranger had his hands on his hips and was just staring at it like he couldn't believe what he was seeing. The dog was HUGE. My family saw that one.

The next sighting was when my son and I took a trip from our campground (we usually stayed at Big Rock) which is the second campground from Lincoln (first one on the left). We go to the P&G market in town for food. So we were making our way back to lincoln and we were perhaps just about a mile down the road from the campground. I saw a "dog" on the side of the road. It was evening, light was dimming but we could still see pretty well. The "dog" didn't run away when it saw us. Instead it stared at us. Coyotes in New England (and they are different from place to place) don't even like to be seen by humans and take off quickly and quietly usually. I brought my car to a stop and opened the window, pointing out the "coyote" to my son, thinking that's what it was until it had to crouch down quite a bit to duck under the guard rail and started slowly walking to the car and staring at me with his head lowered. My son took a very good look at it. That was absolutely not a coyote! I would guess he was about 80 lbs., compared to the 30 and 40 lb. coyotes that we have.

We used to be avid campers and hikers until my late in life daughter came on the scene and then I put it all on hold for a while because there are dangers up there. But while we were in hiking and camping mode we saw several creatures. My husband always laughed at me because I had made it to like age 35 and had never seen a moose and had lived in NH my whole life. He was from Mass. and he had seen many in his lifetime. My first moose sighting was after we had adopted my sisters 3 kids (sis died of cancer) We were trying to ...they needed so much couseling etc. Anyway we took them to the Whites, (one more way to try to settle them in life and with what life had dealt them). I teased my niece that maybe we would see a moose, but really I had little hope in it as I had never seen one. We were driving through the area of the Kanc that has Blackberry crossing campground and I saw a huge shape down the road. I was stunned as i saw a huge cow moose come out. I parked immediately. My husband was behind me in his van as we didn't have enough seating for all the kids in one car. He parked too. Then the cow fully emerged and a baby bull came out behind her. they trotted down the road toward us and then turned and crossed right in front of us, like 10 feet in front of the hood of my car. Both mother and baby were in perfect shape with good weight and perfect coats. it was amazing!

One day i was driving the kanc alone (not sure why as that hardly ever happened) and i was at the hairpin turn and I saw a wild hare get hit by a car. it was kicking in the road. I got a towel from my trunk and brought it back to Big Rock. We put it nearish the fire because it was either early or late in the season and it was cool and crisp. He stayed there warming up for many hours and then eventually began to move and then hopped away into the woods. this wasn't a bunny, it was a wild hare with the very long ears and very long hind legs.

We saw a black bear once on the highway heading up to camp, around your area (I think) I believe it was exit 29 or so. It was a great sighting of a male black bear. We were on the highway, only one other car near us at all. We slowed and watched him race across the highway and hop the guard rail like it was nothing. I loved that sighting because everyone was safe. The bear wasn't in danger and neither were we. For me it was perfect.

One night while camping at big rock I went to the trunk of my car for something to nibble on. Everyone was at the fire. When I rounded to the back of my car something (that I never saw) growled at me. It was a canine growl definitely. I nearly peed my pants and ran back to the fire. That was a coyote, I'm sure, as it did everything I had been told. I never saw it and it disappeared silently. In the morning there were dog paw prints of a medium sized dog.

The last time i camped I was pregnant with my daughter. My hubby suggested that I should go up to the campground and spend a night there away from the kids. I was very stressed with 4 kids already (my sisters 3, and our 1) and here i was having another after we had been told years before (before we took in my sister's kids) that we would never get pregnant. Any way I was an experienced camper. I made fires better than my husband. He came up with me set up our tent with me and then had to go home as niece was in the band and there was a football game that ended at about 11 that night and then he was coming back in the morning. I was confident and happy. I love nature. None of this was an issue. i had dinner...some subs with the campground host Don as we were pretty good friends. Don was aware I was there alone and told my hubby he would watch out for me. Oh I also had our old fox hound who was very protective of me (which i was told a foxhound would never be). I hadn't taken into account the fact that he had gone almost completely deaf at that time! I tucked in that night, faithful hound at my side. I was woken at midnight or so by several coyotes outside my tent. I hadn't even eaten at the site but at Don's. There must have been some scrap of food left that he had missed  from people before me or perhaps they were drawn to my site because of my dog, because i watched Don pick up the campground. He is very particular! I will never know. Two of them started snarling visciously as if they were fighting over a scrap of meat but from in the tent in the dead of the night I couldn't see anything. I started my lantern. I began to clap loudly and yell at them, knowing coyotes (at least in the Northeast) don't care to be around humans. They didn't leave but continued to fight outside my tent. Meanwhile my dog is still laying there snoring away despite the loud ruckus! (Oh my god I wanted to kill him!)After about 15 minutes they decided to leave. I waited a bit longer leashed my dog and ran for the car which was only about 15 feet away. I went to the campground host who tried to calm me...lol. I needed to tell him I was leaving so he wouldn't worry about my sudden disappearance over night and also there were a few other campers. He's a good friend, but he was like "You're silly, there's nothing out here etc. etc." I said I'm going home! I went home came up the next day feeling quite more secure now that the whole family was there plus one more dog that wasn't hard of hearing. When we came back the next day Don came over and said that a pack had been behind his trailer shortly after i had left. He thought there may have been 5 or 6 adults and then there were some pups as well. I'm not afraid to try that sort of thing again (camping alone) That behavior was atypical at least for the coyotes we have around here. Oh and my campsite was filled with the foot prints of medium sized dogs, not to be confused with my large dog foot print.

But yes I do think that you likely saw a wolf. And don't let people say you're crazy! Trust in yourself. Coyotes and wolves are very different. A coyote is half the size of a wolf roughly. Coyotes tend to have poorer coats since they frequently make dens in the ground, digging a hole in the dirt. Coyotes should run from you. A coyote's song has a lot more high pitched "yips" that a wolf will have. A wolf will stop and look you in the face and size you up. They are bold and not afraid of you (the way you might like to be)The biggest thing of course and its a rule I always practice, let nature be, respect it and if you can, give it a wide birth. I also think the Forestry service is well aware that there are wolves in the White mountains. I think that perhaps they don't advertize it for a variety of reasons. The white mountains, Waterville Valley are vacation spots and telling people will scare away some folks and also draw in others who will seek out the wolves and perhaps harass them to a degree. It would likely end in an attack eventually because we romanticize wolves. That is the very last thing the forest service wants, because that always end only one way. The animal being rounded up and moved or killed. We certainly cannot afford to kill any of the few wolves that likely do exist and they are likely to travel back anyway. This really is a no win situation, with the best chance for them being the forestry service calling these rare sightings "an overactive imagination" or a misidentification ("No no it was a coyote of course because we don't have wolves") None of my girlfriends camp in a tent in a sleeping bag. I think reports of wolves would lead to less family camping even less trailer camping, because the word wolf is a bit bigger and scarier than other things out there, most of those other things would rather avoid you. I will never in my lifetime forget that forest ranger's whole attitude in the way he was standing and looking at the dead wolf on the ground. It really said everything I needed to know!

Also just one final note, sorry this is so long. In trying to get a handle on how many coyotes I heard last night, which i am finding a difficult task, I have looked at various youtube videos. I saw one with wolves and coyotes at Yosemite. Ours are definitely different. The coyotes appeared more like our foxes with small bodies and overly large ears and the wolves they pictured looked more the size and shape of our coyotes. Of course such things are difficult when you see them in a field with nothing to referrence their actual size. But our gray wolves are quite large! When I saw that final sighting with my son. We at the time had my male Amercan foxhound. We had weighed him at 85 lbs. (Okay yeah he looked like a sausage with legs at that time but he was getting old.) The "coyote" (as forest rangers would tell me), that had to duck to get under the guard rail, was about 20 feet away. I could see him clearly. The huge big thought that ran through my mind at that moment when he entered the road and began to approach us was that "Wow he's bigger than Crosby!" I just checked with my son who said I actually uttered that. So here's the riddle...what's bigger than an 85lb dog and that has the general coloring of a coyote minus any brown (he was only gray) and about 6 miles from any town, yet in very good shape. What are you coming up with for an answer? Yeah that's what i thought!

Ultimately consider yourself very lucky to have seen that great beast in reasonably safe circumstances. I think they are still quite rare in our parts! Regards! feel free to contact me!

March 13, 2012 07:00 AM #53
Rainer
73,433
Jan Stearns
Jan Stearns, Waterville Valley Realty, Waterville Valley, NH - Waterville Valley, NH
Marketing Dir. 1-888-987-8333

WOW, michele from Derry, very interesting reading.  Thank you so much for stopping by and sharing your stories.  I agree with you that Fish & Game and other "authorities" don't want to acknowledge the existence of wolves in New Hampshire because it would be bad for the tourist business.  It's probably better that those of us who have seen wolves should just quietly enjoy our lucky sightings.  New Hampshire's forests are big enough that they'll hopefully be able to continue to co-exist with us humans without danger to us or them. 

But, we need to remember to be diligent about keeping our small domesticated pets indoors and/or well supervised.  I know from experience.  I've lost three cats to wild animals.  Not sure what snatched them, but in one case we heard the tussle and the screeching of our cat as she was grabbed off our deck.

Cheers,

Jan

March 13, 2012 08:22 AM #54
Anonymous
Anonymous
Jenn

Really happy to have found this site. I was barley awake this morning when my husband told me to come to the window. I came, what I saw amazed me. I have seen coyote here planty of times. I really do not know what I saw this morning though. We saw what looked like a very large coyote in the back yard. He was standing there checking out my hens who had just been let out. He sat, looked, stood up and buckled down in a crouch position and then took off like a bolt of lightening. I kid you not, when he jumped for my hen who was trying to jump up to a branch his hind legs were about three or four feet off the ground. He caught her in mid air and took off running with her. WHen talking to my neighbor he asked me descride what I saw. I did, and after a few minutes he decided that what I saw was way to big to be an Eastern coyote. His assumption is that it was either a small wolf or a large hybrid coy/grey wolf. Not sure what the difference is. NH Fish and Game laughed at me when I asked what they thought. THey told me that there was no way I had a wolf, and that coy dont get as big as what I was describing. Nice of them to laugh at me. I have never seen either of these animals near anything that I can stand next to for a comparison, until today. He stood next to my garden, near my rock wall, and best of all...near and upright garden stake. I could never have asked for a better set of circumstances for comparison! He was beautiful! His shoulder area was HUGE and his rear area was small. Not like a domestic dog where they are pretty well proportional. WHen he ran at my girls he reminded me of a deer. He held his tail up, ran and lept into the air. Looke dike his fur was all puffed up when he was just standing there, so my size estimate may be off a bit, but he was still really big. I have seen coyote, dead, when held up by someone my size (5ft) by their hind legs the front paws are close, but dont reach the ground. My husband could have held this one and the paws would still have touched the ground. I will be on the look out with my camera for sure from now on! Few weeks ago we did have coy sitting ten feet from our house howling all night long, two nights in a row. We put the deer light in them and they were BY FAR SMALLER than what we saw today!

March 16, 2012 07:08 AM #55
Anonymous
Anonymous
Nancy

Wow, a couple of summers ago, in broad daylight, my husband myself and two kids were driving on Route 16 in the wakefield, sanborville area when we saw a goose running along the breakdown lane. I said to my husband "look" and pointed and all of a sudden this huge dog like gray animal came running out from the woods and darted right across route 16 in front of our car. My husband didnt even get a chance to put on the brakes its happened to quick. I said to him"what the heck was that????" to which he replied "I dont know, it looked like a wolf huh?" and I said "yaaa". We have seen many coyotes and this was not a coyote. It was a different color, alot bigger and a huge head.  I have no doubt it was a wolf, and I cant believe they say that they are extinct in NH with all these sightings!

April 08, 2012 08:16 PM #56
Rainer
73,433
Jan Stearns
Jan Stearns, Waterville Valley Realty, Waterville Valley, NH - Waterville Valley, NH
Marketing Dir. 1-888-987-8333

Thanks for stopping by and sharing your stories, Jenn and Nancy.  After reading all these responses, it IS hard to believe that Fish & Game officials deny that wolves are in New Hampshire.  Oh well, I guess it's our little secret...Wish one of us could get a picture.

Cheers,
Jan

April 09, 2012 05:54 AM #57
Anonymous
Anonymous
Big O'

Ya know, makes me sad...if we could just put our iPhone, lap tops, video games, iPad, note books, cell phones, face book, twitter, com-cast, and any other gadget I left out down for just a moment, I think that would be the greatest sighting yet!!! I read all the posts, great stuff..but a common theme seems to be disbelief..and we have to reference this doubt..Is the area of interest the fact that there are wild things among us..or the doubt in our minds as to what we may have seen?..all that comes to mind is wake up!!! wake from your sleep people..wake up..He is there..and he is watching your every move, growing stronger and smarter, becoming bolder..2nd common theme here from these posts..is the look back..or the moment of pause as the animal looks at you or turns back for a moment, before running off..remember back to that exact moment and what did you feel in that second that felt like an hour? fear, small, confused, angry, sad, shocked,..why did he stop to gaze back? he doesn't have to work, or text billy, or bring the kids to school, or stress out about paying the electric bill on time or the mortgage, or call the cell phone company because you didn't get the app you just down loaded..why did he look back? was he taking that same mental image at the same exact time you were? did he really run away after that? or just out of your site?..living, breathing, seeing, believing is the privilege he gave to you in that one look...wake up my friends wake up from your sleep.................................Will finish on this final thought..I was young graduate student from New England, at the University OF Hawaii finishing my time abroad..Decided to catch some local surf action after class with my roommate at the time..we paddled out to the waves got in line with a few local men to wait our turn to catch a wave..When a tiger shark the size of a Cadillac surfaced and bit my roommates arm in half..was one of the most craziest things I have ever witnessed in my life..we saved my friend..and his arm that day..as I was on the beach I found myself talking out loud saying "how could this of happened" and an old local man that had seen the whole thing turned to me in a soft voice and said.."just because you didn't see the shark doesn't mean he isn't there"

May 04, 2012 09:46 PM #58
Anonymous
Anonymous
M
I've seen two grey wolves (I'm fairly sure) in southern NH. One was 10 yrs ago in Spofford, NH. The other was ~ a month ago in Westmoreland, NH. It ran across the road a distance ahead of me, I slowed down to see if I could see it in the field and did, it was standing there looking at my car from the field, fairly close. I got a very good look at it. I do think if wolves make it down here, they tend to be lost from the pack. I don't think there has been any pack sightings.
May 29, 2012 08:46 PM #59
Rainer
73,433
Jan Stearns
Jan Stearns, Waterville Valley Realty, Waterville Valley, NH - Waterville Valley, NH
Marketing Dir. 1-888-987-8333

Hi Big O' & M!  Thank you both for stopping by and sharing your thoughts and stories. 

I haven't heard of any pack sightings - just lone wolves, which based on what I've read is rather typical of a male wolf. 

I just received an email from someone who recently saw a wolf in East Haverhill, NH...so the sightings continue throughout the state.

Wish someone could get some scat and/or fur that they could do DNA tests on.

Cheers everyone,

Jan

May 30, 2012 06:27 AM #60
Anonymous
Anonymous
E

Since there ARE wolves in Eastern Canada, why wouldn't they come down into Northern New England? I doubt they care about international borders!

July 19, 2012 06:42 PM #61
Rainer
73,433
Jan Stearns
Jan Stearns, Waterville Valley Realty, Waterville Valley, NH - Waterville Valley, NH
Marketing Dir. 1-888-987-8333

LOL, so true!  Sort of like the "Moose Crossing" signs - moose aren't confined to just those crossings!  I was driving a South African friend to the mall some years back.  She asked me how the moose know to stay in the "Moose Crossing" zones!

Thanks for stopping by,

Jan

July 20, 2012 05:56 AM #62
Rainer
73,433
Jan Stearns
Jan Stearns, Waterville Valley Realty, Waterville Valley, NH - Waterville Valley, NH
Marketing Dir. 1-888-987-8333

Message for Sandy Glencross (#26 & #27 above) ... if you see this message would you please email me?  A man has just emailed me today after reading your comment and expressed interest in learning more about the photo you have of a mountain lion in Strafford - and details about exactly where you saw (or photographed) the mountain lion.

Please email me at wci@wvnh.com or give me a call at 603-236-3333.

Thanks, Sandy!

Jan

August 03, 2012 03:20 PM #63
Anonymous
Anonymous
Donna

We saw a wolf in Hollis, NH this week.  As the others have stated above, we know the difference between a coyote and a wolf, and this definitely looked exactly like the picture above.  While it shocked us at first, it made you feel like  you had a unique experience, something like seeing Santa Claus: you know he doesn't really exist, but then there he is before your very eyes.  Donna

November 25, 2012 06:52 AM #64
Anonymous
Anonymous
Roxanna Jones

 My husband and I were traveling from Littleton toward Whitefield (Technically Bethlehem) and we saw a wolf run across the road in front of our car.  He was huge.  Never seen one before.  I have seen coyotes before this was not that and it was not a dog - it was a wolf.

 

November 05, 2013 04:35 PM #65
Anonymous
Anonymous
Anonymous
A friend of my gf's daughter had his car break down recently on Corrigan Hill near Lancaster, NH and was walking up the hill to his house when he believes he was tracked by a wolf through the woods nearby. He was fairly upset and posted about it on FB.
February 03, 2014 07:04 PM #66
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Accessibility option: listen to a question and answer it!

To submit the form,
drag the magnifying-glass to the circle on the side.

Type below the answer to what you hear. Numbers or words, lowercase:

Additional Information