Will stated income loans ever come back?

By
Real Estate Mortgage Broker with Sierra Pacific Mortgage Raleigh

Many self employed folks ask this question.  In my opinion, yes. I think stated income loans will once again be a prodcut offered by most banks. Here is why I think this will happen:  Mortgages are bundled up and sold as securities (bonds).  Right now the federal government is buying most of these securities. Hence the reason for such low interest rates and strict underwriting guidelines.

When the Feds stop buying mortgage backed securities and private investors begin buying them it's my belief that they will eventually get tired of a paltry 2%-3% return on their bond investments.  This desire for a higher rate of return I believe will once again spur creative financing options.

Why would banks do this?  Because investors are often willing to take higher risks for a higher rate of return.  If any of you reading this own stock in a company or a mutual fund then you have likely taken risk higher than that of a US Treasury.  It's a matter of demand - if investors want it then banks will produce it.  However I seriously doubt you will ever see underwriting as liberal as it used to be.

Approximately 10.4 million Americans are self employed. During the housing crises many of the stated income loans were available to wage earners (W2 employees).  This loan product was initially created for self employed borrowers with complicated tax returns.  But with a strong demand for higher returns the stated income wage earner and no doc loans were born. The stated income wage earner loan was the main culprit for mortgage defaults on the stated income loan versus those for the self employed borrower.

 

 

Bond rating agencies are to blame for our housing crisis.

Bond chart

 

These were rated as AAA (low risk) mortgages when in fact there were a lot of high risk loans mixed with the low risk loans. Sort of like selling a bag of apples with rotten ones hidden at the bottom but then telling you they are all fresh. Had the bond rating agencies rated the bonds accurately and had investors knew what they were buying the crisis would have unfolded differently.  Less people have an appetite for low rated bonds and a much smaller segment of the mortgages would have defaulted.

 

As long as regulators carefully screen bond ratings on mortgage backed securities then I don't see more stated income loan issues when they come back.

 

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Topic:
Mortgage / Finance
Groups:
All About Mortgages/Mortgage Networking
Mortgages
Realtors®
The Summit
Tags:
mortgages
mortgage backed securities
bonds
stated income loan

Comments 12 New Comment

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Rainmaker
1,205,506
Carla Muss-Jacobs, Principal Broker/Owner
Buyer Focused ~ Buyer Results
BuyersAgentPortland.com | (503) 810-7192 Portland Metro Exclusive Buyers Agent | 100% Buyer Representation ~ 100% of the Time

Good question Nevin.  The numbers of self-employed people says a lot.  I would think 10.4M is understating however.

February 10, 2010 11:58 AM
Rainmaker
392,564
Nevin Williams
Raleigh Mortgage Pro
Sierra Pacific Mortgage Raleigh

Carla - You probably right.  I used statistical data from US Census but I'm sure they are missing a lot.

February 10, 2010 04:44 PM
Anonymous #12
Anonymous
Janice

Hey there,

My husband is a SE and we have a stated loan with the bank now a 7.something % interest on a 30 yr. fixed.  He is interested in lowering the interest rate as well as putting it on a 15 yr.  We as well will have to do a stated loan.  He has neve been late on the mortgage.  Can you help us with any info. that might help us? 

November 15, 2010 09:12 AM
Anonymous #13
Anonymous
Joey

Nevin,

I have a client who fits the 70% LTV, Great Credit and Assets and is in California. The client is Self Employed and needs a Stated Income loan. The client is high profile and I can not provide too much info. How can I touch base with you to find out which lenders are still doing Stated Income?

December 09, 2010 05:11 PM
Rainmaker
392,564
Nevin Williams
Raleigh Mortgage Pro
Sierra Pacific Mortgage Raleigh

Janice - I sent you a PM

Joey - Unfortunately Barney Frank and Christopher Dodd created and passed a law that prohibits lenders from funding loans without checking the income of the client otherwise the lender can be sued if the borrower defaults on their mortgage.  For this reason I don;t think we will see them come back.  Not that they aren't in demand, our politicians killed this chance for excellent credit self employed borrowers

December 09, 2010 07:14 PM
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Rainmaker
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Nevin Williams

Raleigh Mortgage Pro
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