Photo Tip - White Balance

By
Services for Real Estate Pros with Ark-La-Tex Virtual Media

This month’s photo tip is about White Balance.  If you have ever taken a picture that turned out orange or blue or some other strange color, then you have experienced the effects of white balance.

null White balance compensates for the different colors emitted by different types of light sources and adjusting your white balance accordingly will make your pictures into powerful marketing tools.

White balance controls should be easily accessed from you camera’s menu.  If you are unsure how to get to it, consult your manual.  Here is what you need to know.  White balance controls include settings for sun, shade, overcast, incandescent light, fluorescent light, and flash.  Some cameras will include others as well, but these are the most important for real estate photography.

Chose the setting that most closely matches your light source.  If you are shooting on a sunny day, choose the sun setting; if you are shooting on an overcast day, chose overcast; etc.  Now, here’s the super secret tip: if you are shooting inside with mixed light (lamps and window light) choose the overcast setting.  This will give your images a warm and inviting look.

That’s it!  Have photo questions?  Email your pictures or questions to Ark-La-Tex Virtual Tours.  You may even see your tips turn up here!

Kitchen

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Re-Blogged 2 times:

Re-Blogged By Re-Blogged At
  1. John Pusa 03/01/2010 11:31 AM
  2. Darrell Backen 04/02/2010 05:44 PM
Topic:
Real Estate Technology & Tools
Groups:
RTV Virtual Tours
Tags:
photography
photos
real estate
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Show All Comments
Rainmaker
1,180,141
John Pusa
Sellstate Pacific Realty - Glendale, CA
Your All Time Realtor With Exceptional Service

Gary & Rebecca - Thank you for sharing an informative and helpful blog.

John

Mar 01, 2010 11:30 AM #1
Rainer
71,550
Pat, Ben and Martin Mullikin
Mullikin Family Realty Group Realty Executives - Integrity - Brookfield, WI

Thanks for the easy explanation. I have a pretty good camera that I have kinda-sorta learned to use by trial and error. I look forward to checking into your blog more often for photography advice!

Mar 12, 2010 08:18 PM #3
Rainmaker
45,214
Peter and Dawn Smith
Circle Shot Media - Vancouver, WA

great tips, like Karen above I am shocked when I see photos uploaded that could've been so much better with a simple adjustment either WB before the picture was taken, or by correcting with Picasa or Windows photo or whatever afterwards.

 I would advise people to take care and not get carried away messing with white balance too much, as the auto setting usually is pretty close.

Still, a great piece of advice. Thanks

Peter Smith

Circle Shot Media

Mar 13, 2010 12:38 AM #4
Rainmaker
49,104
Ingrid Laine
C&F Mortgage - Virginia Beach, VA
Sr. Loan Officer, North End, Virginia Beach

Ohhh... So that's what those pictures on my Nikon are for. (I am not being sarcastic) I always wondered what they did. I just assumed they were for professional photographers. Thanks! I will tinker with those settings today. -Ingrid

Mar 14, 2010 02:08 PM #5
Anonymous
Anonymous
Rebecca Bolda

Thanks everyone, I am glad you found this helpful. 

Ingrid, be sure you are looking at the white balance and not the settings on the little dial on the top of the camera (those are for something else).  The white balance on Nikon is usually a little button on the back of the camera marked "WB".  When you press it, your options will appear in the screen on the top of the camera next to the shutter button.  Consult you manual to be certain as this can differ from camera to camera.

Mar 15, 2010 08:32 AM #6
Rainmaker
199,884
Sam DeBord
SeattleHome.com -Coldwell Banker Danforth - Seattle, WA
Seattle Real Estate Broker

It does take some extra time to learn all of the functions on your camera, but worth it, thanks for the tip.

Mar 29, 2010 10:14 AM #8
Rainmaker
430,548
Adam Brett
The Adam and Eric Team - Fullerton, CA
The Adam and Eric Team, Setting the New Standard

Thanks for the tip. Very good information. 

May 15, 2010 06:40 PM #9
Ambassador
717,377
Mike Jones
SUNSTREET MORTGAGE, LLC (BK-0907366, NMLS 145171) - Tucson, AZ
Mike Jones NMLS 223495

Rebecca,

I found your blog post from the Active Rain dashboard.  Useful stuff!

Mike in Tucson

Jul 12, 2010 05:36 PM #10
Rainer
20,942
Justin Adams
Home2Market Real Estate Virtual Tours - San Jose, CA

Good post - here's a point I'd like to add: It's generally best to adjust your white balance first in the camera, and as a second resort, using software like photoshop, etc..  The reason for this is that you can normally get it right )or at letst pretty close) quicker with your camera, without having to tinker with it in software later (this can sometimes get tricky).  If its an interior shot and you're having difficulty with "orangy" color from the lights, try adding a little flash to counteract this.  Good luck, and happy shootin' everyone!

Jul 26, 2010 03:31 AM #11
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Rainer
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Gary and Rebecca Bolda

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