Connecticut Mortgage Rates April 6, 2010

By
Mortgage and Lending with MBC Interactive

Mortgage bond prices fell again last week pushing Connecticut mortgage rates higher. The Fed ended the mortgage backed securities purchase program last Wednesday. There was no coincidence that rates spiked higher Thursday morning with the Fed no longer there to buffer negative movements and keep rates in check. Stock strength also pressured bonds as the Dow approached the 11,000 mark. Escalating oil prices also caused rates to spike higher as inflation fears begin to increase. Fortunately the PCE Price Index data came in as expected. Rates rose about 3/4 of a discount point for the week.

The Treasury auctions will once again take center stage this week. If foreign demand is lackluster like the last few auctions we could see that carry over to the mortgage bond market causing Connecticut mortgage rates to spike. The Fed minutes and weekly jobless claims may also move the market this week.

LOOKING AHEAD

Economic
Indicator

Release
Date & Time

Consensus
Estimate


Analysis

3-year Treasury Note Auction

Tuesday, April 6,
1:15 pm, et

None Important. $40 billion of notes will be auctioned. Strong demand may lead to lower mortgage rates.
Fed Minutes

Tuesday, April 6,
2:00 pm, et

None Important. Details of last Fed meeting. Volatility may surround the release.
Consumer Credit

Wednesday, April 7,
8:30 am, et

Up $1.6 billion Low importance. A significantly larger than expected increase may lead to lower Connecticut mortgage interest rates.
10-year Treasury Note Auction

Wednesday, April 7,
1:15 pm, et

None Important. $21 billion of notes will be auctioned. Strong demand may lead to lower mortgage rates.
Weekly Jobless Claims

Thursday, April 8,
8:30 am, et

430k Moderately Important. An indication unemployment. Higher claims may lead to lower rates.
30-year Treasury Bond Auction

Thursday, April 8,
1:15 pm, et

None Important. $13 billion of bonds will be auctioned. Strong demand may lead to lower mortgage rates.

Treasuries

The 10 and 30-year Treasury bond yields are often viewed as "benchmarks", reflecting the overall state of interest rates in the US economy. Many people concerned about Connecticut mortgage rates track these bonds as a barometer for mortgage interest rates. However, in reality the Treasury and mortgage markets trade independently.

The supply and demand characteristics of Treasury bonds and mortgage-backed securities (MBSs) differ. Treasury securities represent money needed to fund the operations of the US government. MBSs, on the other hand, represent borrowing by homeowners. Demand for mortgage credit is seasonal and is also affected by the state of the overall economy. In terms of demand, Treasury securities are regarded as "risk free" investments, and often benefit from a "flight to quality" in times of financial crisis. Treasury bill, note, and bond prices are dictated by yield requirements and inflationary concerns. Because homeowners can sell or refinance their homes, investors in 30-year mortgage-backed securities usually see principal repayment in significantly shorter periods of time.

In the absence of information directly related to the mortgage interest rate markets, Treasury information can be useful. However, CT mortgage rates can vary significantly. In fact, many times the Treasuries will trade wildly while MBSs only see minor price changes and vice versa.

For more information about buying or refinancing a Connecticut home visit www.ToMortgageServices.com, or call directly at (800) 922-3210

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Ambassador
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Ed Silva
RE/MAX Professionals, CT 203-206-0754 - Waterbury, CT
Central CT Real Estate Broker Serving all equally

With the economy as messed up as it is, rising rates will not do much to help.

Apr 06, 2010 09:20 AM #1
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Rainmaker
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Don Polletta

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