November Green Action Tip

By
Real Estate Agent with The Outer Banks Real Estate Copmpany NC 261870

These are some great tips that came to me in an email last week.

25 A-peeling Uses for Fruit and Veggie Scraps

Got watermelon rinds or onion skins? Save money around the house with these creative food waste recycling tips.

Avocado Skin Planter

Nearly all fruit and vegetable skins can be added to the compost pile. But since I'm the ultimate Green Cheapskate, I like to get even more mileage out of my rinds -- at least before I deposit them in my compost pile."A rind is a terrible thing to waste." If you're a composting enthusiast like me, that's our mantra.

Try out these creative uses for your peels next time you're thinking about heading out to the compost pile:

Seedling pots: Scooped-out avocado shells make perfect biodegradable "pots" to start seedlings in before you plant them in the garden.

Potpourri: I dearly love my wife, although she knows that nothing sets me off like store-bought potpourri. ("I have the world's largest supply of that stuff in the back yard ... it's in my compost pile!") Seriously: all types of citrus rinds, apple peels, pomegranate skins, and other fruit trimmings can simply be dried on a rack or in a food dehydrator to make homemade potpourri. Sprinkle a little "liquid potpourri" (available at craft stores) on it for more flavor if desired, or dose it with the dregs of perfume or cologne when you finish up a bottle.

Keep garden slugs at bay, the natural way: Sprinkle ground-up nut shells around tender garden plants to keep slugs and other pests away -- they can't stand crawling across the rough texture. (FYI, I know they're not a fruit or veggie, but crushed eggshells do the same.

Is that peach-fuzz on your face? : You bet. Peaches are high in potassium and Vitamin A, which help to revitalize skin and keep it hydrated. Put a little sugar on the pulpy side of peach skins and use as a gentle face scrub. (Get more natural beauty recipes.)

Make metals shine: Lemon, lime, and other citrus rinds and pulp/juice are high in citric acid, which makes them great for polishing brass, copper, and other non-ferrous metals. Sprinkle on a little baking soda and the polishing goes even faster. (Also see how ketchup works great for shining metals.)

Organic Easter egg dye: Boil your Easter eggs with some onion skins and you'll end up with wild yellow and orange eggshells, all without the use of artificial dyes.

Serving bowls: Watermelons, cantaloupes, honeydews, and other melons can be scooped out and the shells used as attractive (albeit temporary) serving dishes for fruit salads and such. I also scoop out acorn squash halves and use the shells as serving bowls for a tasty acorn squash and cider bisque I make in the fall.

Candied citrus rinds: My great aunt concluded every family dinner by passing around a tray of her homemade candied citrus rinds. Strips of rind from lemons, oranges, grapefruits, and limes can be boiled in a mixture of equal parts water and sugar until the liquid is absorbed (a couple of hours). Coat the cooled strips in granulated sugar and let dry on a rack.

Banana split shoeshine: Put a "split-shine" on your wing-tips by polishing them with the slippery side of a banana peel - it really works!

Throw some peanut shells on the barbie: Peanut shells burn slow 'n smoky, so add a handful to the charcoal next time you're grilling. Soak them in water ahead of time if you think of it, and let them dry a bit before you put them in the coals -- that way they'll burn even longer.

In a pickle: All kinds-o-rinds can be pickled and eaten as a delicious condiment. Most recipes for pickled watermelon, lemon, orange, and even pumpkin rind involve a simple mixture of vinegar, sugar, and spices, and some can simply be stored in the fridge rather than canned once prepared.

In a jam: Marmalades are simple to make, even for those new to jam cookery. They can incorporate the skins from a wide variety of fruits -- not just oranges, but lemons, grapefruit, limes, tangerines, and even kumquats.

Cornhusks: Don't even get me started about all of the uses for cornhusks. Back home in Ohio we make cornhusk dolls; in Mexico they're used for cooking tamales; in the Philippines (where there is a Corn Husk Association) they weave them into hats, mats, bags, slippers, and just about everything else. Me, I like to wrap fish and other seafood in fresh, dampened sweet corn husks and grill and serve them that way.

Pomegranate skin to the rescue: Suffering from diarrhea? Boil a little pomegranate skin in water with a cinnamon stick and drink it down once it's cooled. Repeat up to three times per day or until diarrhea subsides.

Add an Asian flare: Dried tangerine rind is a tasty -- but expensive -- element in Asian cooking. But you can make your own by simply using a vegetable peeler to remove the orange part of the tangerine, clementine, or tangelo rind (avoid the white/zest) and dry the peels on a rack or in a food dehydrator, once dried, store in an airtight container in the fridge.

Darken grey hair: Just call me Mr. Potato Head! Boil potato peels in water for about a half-hour, strain and let cool. Rinse your hair with this water after shampooing and it will gradually darken grey hair, without the use of harsh chemicals.

Pistachio garden soap: I need a sturdy bar of soap to wash up with after a hard day of yard work. I make my own by pulverizing pistachio shells with a little water in the blender, then mixing it with melted glycerin soap.

Vodka infusions: All kinds of fruit skins -- particularly citrus rinds -- can be added to vodka to create a flavorful infusion. Just add the peels and let it sit for a week or two. (See more tips on how to make infused vodka.)

Olive oil infusions: Adding citrus peels to olive oil will not only flavor it but will help to reinvigorate oil that's getting old. (See more things you can do with old olive oil.)

Apple peels - A Very Good Thing: My mom makes apple-peel jelly, or she sometimes dusts apple skins with sugar and cinnamon and bakes them in the oven as a crispy snack. She's also fond of using a needle and heavy thread to string them up, let them dry, and fashion them into a fall wreath. That woman could teach Martha Stewart a thing or two.

Gourd birdhouses: Larger gourds can be dried, treated, and the shells hollowed out to be used as birdhouses, like in these Amish instructions.

Lemony-fresh smell: Lemon rinds just smell way too good to throw away. Try boiling them in water on the stove top, microwaving them for a minute, or just throwing them in the garbage disposal to freshen the air in the kitchen. And put a couple in the humidifier to make the whole house smell lemony-fresh.

Shinier, healthier houseplants: Use banana peels to shine the leaves on your houseplants -- not only will it make them sparkle, but it acts as a natural pesticide and fertilizer.

Compost pile chicken: I like to stuff all kinds of fruit and veggie peels inside a chicken when I'm roasting it in the oven to give it extra flavor. Trimmings from onions, celery, citrus, apples, garlic, etc. can be stuffed in the chicken cavity or sprinkled around a roast. Plus, once baked, the trimmings break down in the compost pile even faster.

And last but not least .... "My papayas are killin' me!" Rub papaya skins and pulp on the bottoms of your feet to help soften skin and soothe cracked heels. They're rich in Vitamin A and papain, which breaks down inactive proteins and removes dead skin cells. (Plus it feels pretty cool.)

Warning: The skins of vegetables and fruits that are to be consumed or come in contact with food should be thoroughly washed first, even if organically grown.

Jeff Yeager is the author of The Cheapskate Next Door and The Ultimate Cheapskate's Road Map to True Riches. His website is www.UltimateCheapskate.com. Connect with Jeff Yeager on Twitter and Facebook.

Photo Credit: Jeff Yeager



Read more: http://www.thedailygreen.com/living-green/blogs/save-money/food-waste-recycling#ixzz13PPwEvuZ

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Rainmaker
150,840
Trish Sarfert
Coastal Realty Experts - Cantonment, FL
Serving military & civilian relocations!

Jean-Paul, thanks for sharing!  Now, if you have an organic way to keep squash borer beetles out of my garden, I'd love to hear it...

Nov 01, 2010 10:40 AM #1
Rainmaker
319,516
Jean-Paul Peron
The Outer Banks Real Estate Copmpany - Corolla, NC
Carova Beach - Living & Working in 4-Wheel Drive

I'll see what I can do.  :)

Nov 01, 2010 05:08 PM #2
Rainmaker
615,166
David Popoff
DMK Real Estate - Darien, CT
Realtor & Property Manager, Fairfield County, Ct.

JP, where did you come up with all this stuff, love the baked chicken idea, but not sure on the banana peels for shoes.... Thanks for the great idea's and hints ~ Dave

Nov 22, 2010 05:48 PM #3
Rainmaker
319,516
Jean-Paul Peron
The Outer Banks Real Estate Copmpany - Corolla, NC
Carova Beach - Living & Working in 4-Wheel Drive

They were emailed to me from Sun Realty.

Nov 24, 2010 06:34 AM #4
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Rainmaker
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Jean-Paul Peron

Carova Beach - Living & Working in 4-Wheel Drive
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