Engineered Wood VS Solid Wood Flooring: Which one is better?

By
Home Stager with Abella Home Staging & Redesign

Engineered Wood  VS Solid Wood Flooring: Which one is better? This is a debut that can take a life of it's own. Awhile back I wrote a blog on "The Pro's and Con's of Laminated floors" And I touch upon some of these features. But wood has different features that you will want to consider when making a choice. So what are the Con's and what are the Pro's?

Engineered Wood:

  1. Is not solid wood. Instead it has one, two or three layer of wood over a plywood bottom. (The one version is called a "plank")
  2. Can be laid like "floating" floor and comes pre-finished. They come in tongue and groove and you just need to "click" it together. No need for glue or nails.
  3. Because of it's plywood base, engineered wood is less susceptible to expansion like real wood.
  4. Engineered wood comes in more then one type. Some types have a high-density base with a very thin wood veneer and are less durable then other engineered wood. It the old saying you get what you pay for!
  5. You can get three or four resurfacing at the most. So it's not as long lasting as solid wood.
  6. Easy installation. This is a project do-it-yourselfers can do.

Solid Wood:
  1. They're solid wood and can be stained in any color. Or you can buy them pre-finished like engineered wood.
  2. They come in tongue and groove but must be nailed down.
  3. They are highly susceptible to moisture so you can not installed them in basement, bathrooms or kitchens.
  4. Solid wood floors comes in many different variety of wood, including exotic wood
  5. It's more expensive then engineered wood.
  6. You can refinish a solid wood flooring more times then an engineered floor. Making it more durable. Something to consider if you have pets.
  7. Installation can be difficult. Because wood needs to breathe you must leave space for it to expand or it will buckle.
Most of the time budget will be a contributing factor. But you should consider other factors like moisture. Consider the rooms you will be installing them. If you're considering putting it in the basement, I would recommend engineered wood. Engineered wood vs solid wood flooring, which one is better? Only you can decide!!



Engineered Wood Installation



Solid Wood Installation

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Rainmaker
390,210
Gina Tufano
Ask Gina & Company with Keller Williams Realty Loudoun Gateway - Sterling, VA
Ask Gina & Company, Northern Virginia Real Estate

Great post - a subject that needed clarifying!

May 10, 2011 08:14 AM #1
Rainer
66,114
Carmela Abella
Abella Home Staging & Redesign - Centereach, NY

Thanks Gina, I'm glad I can help.

May 10, 2011 09:43 AM #2
Rainer
36,056
Leanne Allen
Center Stage, LLC - Burlington, IA

Another issue is the thickness of the two products.  We're planning on replacing our kitchen and dining room floors in the near future, but adding 3/4" thick solid wood flooring would create some "height" challenges around doorways and such.  On the other hand, 3/8" engineered flooring would be much easier to deal wtih and would still allow us to have the look of real wood (laminate just isn't the same, IMO).    

I'd love to hear more from anyone who has used the engineered flooring.  I'm curious about how well it holds up under traffic, barstools, etc.  Thanks for the post, Carmela!

May 18, 2011 12:11 AM #3
Rainer
66,114
Carmela Abella
Abella Home Staging & Redesign - Centereach, NY

Leanne, I have a friend who does flooring, make sure the thickness of the wood is of good quality and the underneath is also of good quality. If the top layer is thin you will only get one resurfacing from it .The thicker the wood the more choice you have to resurface.

May 18, 2011 09:04 AM #4
Anonymous
Anonymous
Richie Darby

But which one would be long lasting? Or we can say which one won't need investments for a longer period of time?

 

Discount Flooring

June 14, 2011 02:43 AM #5
Anonymous
Anonymous
Richie Darby

But which one would be long lasting? Or we can say which one won't need investments for a longer period of time?

 

Discount Flooring

June 14, 2011 02:43 AM #6
Anonymous
Anonymous
Richie Darby

But which one would be long lasting? Or we can say which one won't need investments for a longer period of time?

 

Discount Flooring

June 14, 2011 02:43 AM #7
Anonymous
Anonymous
Richie Darby

But which one would be long lasting? Or we can say which one won't need investments for a longer period of time?

 

Discount Flooring

June 14, 2011 02:44 AM #8
Anonymous
Anonymous
Engineered wood floors

Interesting article. It shows tha importance of Engineered wood flooring. Thanks fopr sharing.


<a href="http://www.rtaflooring.com">Engineered wood floors</a>

July 26, 2011 12:26 AM #9
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Carmela Abella

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