If I Sell My House, Will the Tenant Have to Move?

By
Real Estate Agent with Keller Williams Realty

If I Sell My House, Will the Tenant Have to Move?

I was recently asked this question and it is a very good question.  As a property manager, I am often sold by prospective tenants, that the reason that they are moving is because the owner is selling the home.  Of course, if they complete an application with me, I'll do my due diligence and make sure everything jibes.

But from a seller and buyer perspective, they both need to know that if a tenant occupied house is sold, then the new owner, by law, has to honor the existing terms of the lease.  In other words, if the tenant's lease does not expire for another 6 months, and the purchaser is an owner occupant purchaser, then by law (at least Alabama law), the new owner must honor the terms of the existing lease.  In which case, the new owner could not move in to the home until the tenant moved out at the end of the lease term.

The alternative would be if the tenant and the owner (current or future) have come to an agreement with regard to the tenant vacating the property sooner than the end of the lease.

Buyers and sellers should tread very lightly when it comes to making arrangements with the tenant to have them move out early.  Consultation with an attorney would be advisable, so do your due diligence.  If you are currently a buyer or seller in this situation and your real estate agent has not brought up the subject or informed you of existing landlord/tenant laws of your state, then you should bring it up yourself.

Chances are that everything will work out find, but it's best to be prepared and informed.

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Rainer
205,153
Marge Piwowarski
Phoenix AZ Horse Property, LLC
Phoenix AZ Horse Property

That is a sticky wicket for sure.  The lease is valid but it is an unpleasant situation for everyone.  I try to avoid showing tenant occupied property unless my buyer is an investor. 

September 17, 2011 01:12 AM
Rainmaker
490,141
Christine Smith
Exclusive Buyer Agent & Attorney, Canton, MA
Buyers Brokers Only LLC - www.BuyersBrokersOnly.com
It is important for buyers to get all the details up front so they can determine if the tenant can stay or go.
September 18, 2011 09:58 PM
Rainmaker
596,765
Sussie Sutton
Rep for buyers, sellers, and new construction.
UTR Texas Realtors

Very good question and one I did not know. I don't do many rentals.

September 18, 2011 11:04 PM
Ambassador
681,465
Charita Cadenhead
Serving Jefferson and Shelby Counties (Alabama)
Keller Williams Realty

Connie it's not always an issue, and I hope that this will not be an issue either.  Best wishes.

Allison it's an essential converation.  I would be sure to put it at least an email to owner/seller just so your advice is documented and doesn't come back to haunt:-).

Anna you mean I've got the "Tude"?  Thank you for the feature.

Donne that just makes me go "hmmmmmmm?"  There obvious is some good news and bad news about that (at least in California).  In Alabama, the law favors (make that highly favorss) tenants so that would never fly here.

Marge I understand completely but I hope you're still giving the buyer the option particularly if the lease is near it's end.

Without question Christine.  That's why it's important for selling agents to know their State's landlord/tenant laws.

Sussie but it's good to keep up with the law just in case.

 

 

September 19, 2011 08:19 AM
Rainmaker
598,584
Donne Knudsen
CalState Realty Services
Los Angeles & Ventura Counties in CA

Charita - LOL  Landlords here often say that CA tenant laws favor tenants because by law tenants are entitled to "sufficient notice".  If landlords had their way, there wouldn't be any law preventing landlords from evicting anyone at any time they (the landlords) feel like it.  Many landlords feel like it's a violation of their rights not to be able to eviction someone whenever they want at a moments notice.

With my borrowers purchasing tenant occupied property as an owner-occupied borrower, I always advise them that it's best to get proof of eviction having already been served prior to making the offer because tenants vacating the property is almost always a PTF condition.

September 19, 2011 04:41 PM
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Charita Cadenhead

Serving Jefferson and Shelby Counties (Alabama)
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