Mortgage lender, banker, broker: Big differences, and why you care!

By
Real Estate Mortgage Broker with LX Financial LLC

There are important practical differences between a Mortgage Lender, Mortgage Banker, and a Mortgage Broker. Mortgage financing is a key element of the purchase process, so it pays to understand the options.  It is particularly good to understand the mortgage banking concept, which allows you to in effect make full application to many lenders all at once - very advantageous in today’s mortgage environment! /// Next week a synopsis of loan decisioning, also useful to know, and the week following a summary of the current benefits of portfolio loans. /// Comments, questions, service? Contact me. – Paul Luykx, Mortgage Banker

What they are
>>Mortgage Lenders are usually depository institutions (banks, credit unions). They have a single line of products and unique lending criteria. All mortgages are sold in the secondary market (mostly Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac).
>>Mortgage Bankers use their own money to fund mortgages. They sell the mortgages either to Mortgage Lenders, or the secondary market. They offer a broad range of loan products and have the flexibility of matching an application with the lending criteria of an investor to whom they sell loans. Mortgage banking is now the hottest business model in mortgage financing because you are in effect applying to many lenders, all at once!
>>Mortgage Brokers are intermediaries who brings mortgage borrowers and mortgage lenders together, but do not use their own funds to originate mortgages.

What they have in common
>>Pricing: Lenders need to pay for all loan originations 
somehow, whether they pay their own sales force, their own branch network, bankers, or brokers. At the end of the day rates and fees are therefore pretty similar.
>>Equal pricing: Commissions no longer depend on the rate charged so the focus is now always on getting the approval on the best possible terms – lender, banker, or broker.
>>All loans are sold in the secondary market, portfolio loans excepted.

The differences
The practical differences between a lender, banker, and broker, are the breadth of loan programs offered, expertise, and loan decisioning:
>>Mortgage lenders are limited to their own mortgage products and lending criteria. If your application is handled by an application-taker instead of a capable mortgage specialist, you are at risks of delays, or denials.
>>Mortgage Bankers (like me) have expertise, a broad product offering, and the flexibility of matching and approving applications with the criteria of one of their many investors. You are in effect applying to multiple lenders at the same time!
>>Mortgage Brokers have expertise and choice of lender, but do not approve loans. If a lender declines a loan it needs to be submitted elsewhere.

 

 

 

close

This entry hasn't been re-blogged:

Re-Blogged By Re-Blogged At
Spam prevention

Accessibility option: listen to a question and answer it!

To submit the form,
drag the clock to the circle on the side.

Type below the answer to what you hear. Numbers or words, lowercase:

Topic:
ActiveRain Community
Location:
New Jersey
Tags:
mortgage banker
morgage lender
mortgage broker
shop mortgage

Comments 0 New Comment

Anonymous
Post a Comment
Spam prevention

Accessibility option: listen to a question and answer it!

To submit the form,
drag the foot to the circle on the side.

Type below the answer to what you hear. Numbers or words, lowercase:

Anonymous
Post a Comment
Spam prevention

Accessibility option: listen to a question and answer it!

To submit the form,
drag the airplane to the circle on the side.

Type below the answer to what you hear. Numbers or words, lowercase:

Rainmaker
51,608

Paul Luykx

Ask me a question
*
*
*
Spam prevention

Accessibility option: listen to a question and answer it!

To submit the form,
drag the world to the circle on the side.

Type below the answer to what you hear. Numbers or words, lowercase:

Additional Information

Mortgage financing news and topics, and meaningful advice for real estate professionals and consumers.