Port Jefferson Station

By
Real Estate Agent with Weichert Realtors, Prospect Hill

Port Jefferson Station

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Beginnings: The area was first known as Comsewogue, which in the language of the Setalcott Indians means a place where several paths come together. The first white resident was William Tooker, who by 1750 was living in a house that still stands on Sheep Pasture Road at Reeves Road.

Turning Points: Port Jefferson Station remained primarily a farming community until the 1950s. But there was a spurt of development in 1873, when the Long Island Rail Road extended service to Port Jefferson. The depot was designed by Stanford White. The construction of Nesconset Highway in the mid-1950s opened the area for rapid development. The area known as Comsewogue has drifted south over the years.

Claim to Fame: Maurice Richard in 1909 erected a factory south of the tracks and west of Route 112. It housed his Only Car Co., the name referring to the fact that the car's engine had only one cylinder. Richard produced only a few cars before the company failed. In 1921, the Port Jefferson Lace Co. opened in the warehouse and eventually expanded and became the Thomas Wilson & Co. employing 300 people. The lace factory produced mosquito netting, camouflage nets and parachutes in World War II and surgical leotards that helped prevent vascular problems for the first astronauts. The lace operations continued into the 1980s.

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Anonymous #1
Anonymous
Chris Mezzolesta

Thanks for the info, I've been trying to find anything on the old lace mill for a few years now (still can't get my head around it being the multi-use place it ended up to be - nor the parking lots extending so far back down behind the Clifton Pl homes) - my grandfather was brought down from Newburgh in 1948 to work at the mill, and was eventually foreman; he devised the fabric weave that resulted in the NASA suit material and later became Jobes burn stocking fabric. They lived literally down the block from the mill at the corner of Clifton and Piedmont, so my grandfather would walk to work each day, and back for lunch. My mom and aunt grew up in that house and neighborhood, their neighbor Mr Charlie Liebbrand was at one time the PJS fire chief. My aunt moved back into the house after my grandfather passed in 1992, and sold it in 2003 (the house was newly built for when they moved down from Orange County). I can still vaguely remember bits and pieces of old "down Port" before its descent and rebirth...Oettinger's store (or at least the remnants of the name on a building!!), definitely Grammas' drug store, Cappy's carpets, and the old Bohack, not to mention a rare Gristedes sighting. Thanks once again for the info on the lace mill.

September 07, 2012 06:42 PM
Anonymous #2
Anonymous
Charles Paul

TW was my first job at 16 and I stayed there for almost 10 years - '65 to '74.  I was a floor boy - a weavers apprectice and a beamer.  I did almost every job in the plant and ended as a knitter in the plants knit mill.  I am 63 and have fond memories of the plant.  It was not a bad place to work.  My father Dave Paul was a weaver there for about 15 years coming there from a NJ mill.  We lived for a time in the apartments behind the plant.  Many plant people lived on those streets arounf the factory.

January 29, 2013 03:28 PM
Anonymous #3
Anonymous
sally

Melissa, My grandfather and father both were owners of Thomas Wilson Lace I may have more info for you

June 08, 2013 08:13 AM
Anonymous #4
Anonymous
Steven DArgenio

My father Raymond D'Argenio worked there from 1968 until he died in 1983. Was a foreman at Thomas Wilson at the time of his death. Curious if any of you remember him and have any recollections.

 

Thanks

 

 

October 11, 2013 10:04 AM
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Rainer
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Melissa Petsco/LSA

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