What temperature is your vacant listing's thermostat set at?

By
Real Estate Agent with Elite Realty Plus, LLC

Not long ago, my real estate partner, Rachel Myrick, and I showed 7 houses in a day. It was chilly outside, wet, muddy, etc. You get the picture. Of the 7, almost half were vacant. One of the vacant houses had the thermostat set to around 58 degrees F. The house was listed for over $500k. It wasn't a short sale or REO. We didn't stay inside the house for long. We were uncomfortably cold. What a shame. It was really a nice house. I believe that if the thermostat was set to at least 68 degrees F we would have stayed longer and the house would of made more of a positive impression on our clients. I don't know why the thermostat was set so low and I didn't ask, but it appears that the home owner was saving pennies over the possible sale of the house.

Again, over the weekend, I went to a home inspection in a vacant house. The old round Honeywell thermostat was all the way to the right. That's about 45 degrees F. It was literally warmer outside than it was inside.

My advice to listing agents is to convince your client to let you keep the thermostat up at a comfortable temperature.

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Fredericksburg Area Association of REALTORS®
Tags:
thermostat
vacant house

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Rainer
143,765
Gary J. Rocks
Werner Realty

Kenny

Thanks for the information. that's easier said than done! In my neck of the woods most everyone heats with oil and prices are north of $3.00 per gallon that becomes very costly heating a vacant house. The best bet would be to have a programmable thermostat and have it coincide with the timing on your lock box.

March 10, 2008 04:46 PM
Rainer
23,804
Kenny Franklin
ABR®, AHWD, e-PRO®, SFR
Elite Realty Plus, LLC
Gary - Heating with oil sure is expensive. The owner will just have to weigh the benefits. I just know that my clients don't stay long in a cold house.
March 12, 2008 07:05 AM
Rainer
66,710
Darleen McCullen
Broker - Raleigh, NC Real Estate
Kenny ~ I'm with you. If a home is too cold, typically, my clients won't "linger" - even if the REALLY like the home.
April 09, 2008 09:23 PM
Rainer
4,968
Shannon Whitley
RE/MAX OAK CREST REALTY
RE/MAX OAK CREST REALTY
Kenny I agree, Most vacant homes I look at anymore have the heat set at a cold 55, how can you enjoy a house when you are freezing.........
April 10, 2008 08:20 AM
Anonymous #23
Anonymous
KKD

Try being the homeowner of an immaculate house that has had three offers fall through and now on the market 16 months with bills close to $300 last winter monthly just to keep a few potential buyers warm.  We keep the temperature at 62 degrees, 65 degrees when we live there.  Too bad.  Wear a coat.

November 22, 2008 01:41 AM
Anonymous
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Rainer
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Kenny Franklin

ABR®, AHWD, e-PRO®, SFR
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