FEMA

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Home Inspector with Cartier Fine Home Inspections, LLC

Spent a day traveling to get FEMA certified. You can never have to much education. I went to Parr.com and filled out the application and then registered for the nearest class. It was not be a problem for any Home Inspector. If a weather catastrophe should hit anywhere in these United States or it's Territories, there is an opportunity to make some extra monies.

All of FEMA's work is contracted out to two contractors. FEMA provides the computers and the program isn't to hard. If you are interested, check them out.

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Rainer
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Tom Sinclair
About the House - Home Inspections - Fairhope, AL

Jerome,

What does the FEMA certification allow you to do? Is that for insurance claims or safety insepctions. I don;lt understand. It does sound interesting though: traveling to a disaster area and assisitng those in critical need.

Tom

May 03, 2007 12:15 AM #1
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Scott Patterson
Trace Home Inspections - Spring Hill, TN
Home Inspector, Middle TN

Well to start, FEMA does not certify anyone.  The contractors who have the FEMA contracts (PARR is one of them) train their contractor on what to look at and how to enter the information into a handheld computer.  Since 1990 I have done seven disasters, from hurricanes, floods and fires.  I stopped doing them about five years ago.  If you have an established business and you are the sole inspector, it will shut you down.  You must commit for a period of time 4-6-8 weeks or longer.

Keep in mind that you are entering what is real close to a war zone.  I drove to all of my deployments and pulled a travel trailer.  Many folks are flown in and have to rent cars, if they can find them.  Hotel rooms are not going to be easy to find and if you do find them, they might be a hundred miles away from the are you are working in.  Gas might not be available in the area either, so you have to hunt for it.  Expect many flat tires.  Food, is not a big problem.  Most aid groups will feed the workers good food and plenty of it.  Also all expenses are on your own.  You are an independent contractor.  You will be paid on the average about $50 to $60 per inspection.  After you get use to the system, you should be able to do between 8-12 a day on a good day.

Outside of all of this it is also very depressing, and Yes it does present its rewards as well.

Hope this gives you a little insight as to what a FEMA disaster inspector does.

May 03, 2007 07:49 AM #2
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Jerome Cartier
Cartier Fine Home Inspections, LLC - Fairhope, AL
Cartier Fine Home Inspections

I am a Catastrophe Insurance Adjuster, also. I've spent much time in war zones. FEMA (PARR) is a much easier process than adjusting claims. God has used me to touch many lives and they have touched me also.  I would not trade it for anything. I had seven flat tires living in New Orleans for Katrina/Rita and my travel trailer was my home for 10 months. Your info is so correct.

Thank you for your Veteran knowledge.

May 03, 2007 10:30 AM #3
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Jamie Wisecup
Colorado Thermal Imaging - Steamboat Springs, CO
I worked for Fema in Mississippi after Katrina-it was exactly as described above. Some people truly needed help and were very grateful. It was a difficult job at times, but I wouldn't trade the experience and will go again if needed.
May 04, 2007 10:35 PM #4
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Jerome Cartier

Cartier Fine Home Inspections
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